4 Comments

Lundy’s Lane and the Niagara Front in 1814

Great blog!

War and Security

Major General Jacob Brown, commanding the US Left Division, failed to follow up the US victory at Chippawa on 5 July

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Map_of_the_Niagara_Frontier,_1869.jpg The Niagara Front Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Map_of_the_Niagara_Frontier,_1869.jpg

1812. He allowed the defeated British, commanded by Major General Phineas Riall, to retreat to Fort George near the mouth of the River Niagara on Lake Ontario.

Brown advanced to Queenston, a few miles south of Fort George, but his force, whose largest guns were 18 pounders, was too weak to assault it. He hoped that 24 pounders might be brought from Sacket’s Harbor, but British control of the lake made this impossible. On 24 July the Americans withdrew behind the River Chippawa in order to re-supply before moving on the Burlington Heights.

Lieutenant General Gordon Drummond, the Lieutenant Governor of Upper Canada, ordered a British force under Lieutenant Colonel John Tucker to advance from Fort Niagara along the east bank…

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4 comments on “Lundy’s Lane and the Niagara Front in 1814

  1. Good choice. You can depend on Martin’s extensive research.

  2. Thanks for the reblog and the kind words.

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